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Plugging Application Authentication Leaks in ADFS

by Steve Syfuhs / March 28, 2011 04:00 PM

When you set up ADFS as an IdP for SAML relying parties, you are given a page that allows you to log into the relying parties.  There is nothing particularly interesting about this fact, except that it could be argued that the page allows for information leakage.  Take a look at it:

image

There are two important things to note:

  • I'm not signed in
  • I can see every application that uses this IdP

I'm on the fence about this one.  To some degree I don't care that people know we use ADFS to log into Salesforce.  Frankly, I blogged about it.  However, this could potentially be bad because it can tell an attacker about the applications you use, and the mechanisms you use to authenticate into them.

This is definitely something you should consider when developing your threat models.

Luckily, if you do decide that you don't want the applications to be visible, you can make a quick modification to the IdpInitiatedSignOn.aspx.cs page.

There is a method called SetRpListState:

protected void SetRpListState( object sender, EventArgs e )
{
    RelyingPartyDropDownList.Enabled = OtherRpRadioButton.Checked;
    ConsentDropDownList.Enabled = OtherRpRadioButton.Checked;
}

To get things working I made two quick modifications.  First I added the following line of code to that method:

OtherRpPanel.Visible = this.IsAuthenticated;

Then I added a line to the Page_Init method:

SetRpListState(null, null);

Now unauthenticated users just see this:

image

And authenticated users see everything as expected:

image

You could extend this further and add some logic to look into the App Settings in the web.config to quickly and easily switch between modes.

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Steve is a renaissance kid when it comes to technology. He spends his time in the security stack.