Home / My Disclaimer / Who am I? / Search... / Sign in

// .NET Framework

Free Code Sample Request Service from Microsoft

by Steve Syfuhs / October 28, 2010 04:00 PM

Just came across this on the Decrypt my World blog.  It seems a lot of Microsoft developers are asked for code samples and for lots of valid reasons they can’t provide them.  So Microsoft is fixing that by opening up a service where you can request code samples for any Microsoft technologies.

Here is the official word on what it is:

Developers are encouraged to submit code sample requests dealing with any Microsoft development technologies to our site. At the same time, developers can now vote for newly submitted or existing code sample topics. Here’s the exciting part! Microsoft engineers will then pick the requests with the highest number of votes and provide the code samples. It’s all FREE!

You can find the full write-up here: http://1code.codeplex.com/wikipage?title=NEW%2c%20FREE%20Code%20Sample%20Request%20Service%20from%20Microsoft%20All-In-One%20Code%20Framework

Presenting a TechDays Local Flavours Track Session!

by Steve Syfuhs / October 13, 2010 04:00 PM

Earlier this morning I got an email from John Bristowe congratulating me on being selected to present a session for the local flavours track at TechDays in Toronto!  This bumps up my count to 2.  Needless to say I am REALLY excited.

I was a little disappointed to find out there weren’t any sessions on the Windows Identity Foundation, so that just meant I had to submit my own to the local flavours track…and they accepted it!  Here are the details:

October 27, 3:40 PM to 4:45 PM

Breakout | LFT330: Windows Identity Foundation Simplified: All the Scary Things Made Un-Scary

The Windows Identity Foundation helps simplify user access for developers by externalizing user access from applications via claims and reducing development effort with pre-built security logic and integrated .NET tools. This presentation is an intimate discussion on the basics of the Windows Identity Foundation and its claims model. In this session, you’ll learn how to refactor an existing sample set of applications to use WIF, to connect identities to the Cloud, and to remove the burden of managing multiple disparate user stores.

Location: Metro Toronto Convention Centre - South Building (255 Front Street West, Toronto)

Room: TBA

image

Making an ASP.NET Website Claims Aware with the Windows Identity Foundation

by Steve Syfuhs / August 02, 2010 04:00 PM

Straight from Microsoft this is what the Windows Identity Foundation is:

Windows Identity Foundation helps .NET developers build claims-aware applications that externalize user authentication from the application, improving developer productivity, enhancing application security, and enabling interoperability. Developers can enjoy greater productivity, using a single simplified identity model based on claims. They can create more secure applications with a single user access model, reducing custom implementations and enabling end users to securely access applications via on-premises software as well as cloud services. Finally, they can enjoy greater flexibility in application development through built-in interoperability that allows users, applications, systems and other resources to communicate via claims.

In other words it is a method for centralizing user Identity information, very much like how the Windows Live and OpenID systems work.  The system is reasonably simple.  I have a Membership data store that contains user information.  I want (n) number of websites to use that membership store, EXCEPT I don’t want each application to have direct access to membership data such as passwords.  The way around it is through claims.

In order for this to work you need a central web application called a Secure Token Service (STS).  This application will do authentication and provide a set of available claims.  It will say “hey! I am able to give you the person’s email address, their username and the roles they belong to.”  Each of those pieces of information is a claim.  This message exists in the application’s Federation Metadata

So far you are probably saying “yeah, so what?”

What I haven’t mentioned is that every application (called a Relying Party) that uses this central application has one thing in common: each application doesn’t have to handle authentication – at all.  Each application passes off the authentication request to the central application and the central application does the hard work.  When you type in your username and password, you are typing it into the central application, not one of the many other applications.  Once the central application authenticates your credentials it POST’s the claims back to the other application.  A diagram might help:

image

Image borrowed from the Identity Training kit (http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=C3E315FA-94E2-4028-99CB-904369F177C0&displaylang=en)

The key takeaway is that only one single application does authentication.  Everything else just redirects to it.  So lets actually see what it takes to authenticate against an STS (central application).  In future posts I will go into detail about how to create an STS as well as how to use Active Directory Federation Services, which is an STS that authenticates directly against (you guessed it) Active Directory.

First step is to install the Framework and SDK.

WIF RTW: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=eb9c345f-e830-40b8-a5fe-ae7a864c4d76&displaylang=en

WIF SDK: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=c148b2df-c7af-46bb-9162-2c9422208504

The SDK will install sample projects and add two Visual Studio menu items under the Tools menu.  Both menu items do essentially the same thing, the difference being that “Add STS Reference” pre-populates the wizard with the current web application’s data.

Once the SDK is installed start up Visual Studio as Administrator.  Create a new web application.  Next go to the Properties section and go into the Web section.  Change the Server Settings to use IIS.  You need to use IIS.  To install IIS on Windows 7 check out this post.

image

So far we haven’t done anything crazy.  We’ve just set a new application to use IIS for development.  Next we have some fun.  Let’s add the STS Reference.

To add the STS Reference go to Tools > Add Sts Reference… and fill out the initial screen:

image


Click next and it will prompt you about using an HTTPS connection.  For the sake of this we don’t need HTTPS so just continue.  The next screen asks us about where we get the STS Federation Metadata from.  In this case I already have an STS so I just paste in the URI:

image

Once it downloads the metadata it will ask if we want the Token that the STS sends back to be encrypted.  My recommendation is that we do, but for the sake of this we won’t.

image

As an aside: In order for the STS to encrypt the token it will use a public key to which our application (the Relying Party) will have the private key.  When we select a certificate it will stick that public key in the Relying Party’s own Federation Metadata file.  Anyway… When we click next we are given a list of available Claims the STS can give us:

image
There is nothing to edit here; it’s just informative.  Next we get a summary of what we just did:

image

We can optionally schedule a Windows task to download changes.

We’ve now just added a crap-load of information to the *.config file.  Actually, we really didn’t.  We just told ASP.NET to use the Microsoft.IdentityModel.Web.WSFederationAuthenticationModule to handle authentication requests and Microsoft.IdentityModel.Web.SessionAuthenticationModule to handle session management.  Everything else is just boiler-plate configuration.  So lets test this thing:

  1. Hit F5 – Compile compile compile compile compile… loads up http://localhost/WebApplication1
  2. Page automatically redirects to https://login.myweg.com/login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fusers%2fissue.aspx%3fwa%3dwsignin1.0%26wtrealm%3dhttp%253a%252f%252flocalhost%252fWebApplication1%26wctx%3drm%253d0%2526id%253dpassive%2526ru%253d%25252fWebApplication1%25252f%26wct%3d2010-08-03T23%253a03%253a40Z&wa=wsignin1.0&wtrealm=http%3a%2f%2flocalhost%2fWebApplication1&wctx=rm%3d0%26id%3dpassive%26ru%3d%252fWebApplication1%252f&wct=2010-08-03T23%3a03%3a40Z (notice the variables we’ve passed?)
  3. Type in our username and password…
  4. Redirect to http://localhost/WebApplication1
  5. Yellow Screen of Death

Wait.  What?  If you are running IIS 7.5 and .NET 4.0, ASP.NET will probably blow up.  This is because the data that was POST’ed back to us from the STS had funny characters in the values like angle brackets and stuff.  ASP.NET does not like this.  Rightfully so, Cross Site Scripting attacks suck.  To resolve this you have two choices:

  1. Add <httpRuntime requestValidationMode="2.0" /> to your web.config
  2. Use a proper RequestValidator that can handle responses from Token Services

For the sake of testing add <httpRuntime requestValidationMode="2.0" /> to the web.config and retry the test.  You should be redirected to http://localhost/WebApplication1 and no errors should occur.

Seems like a pointless exercise until you add a chunk of code to the default.aspx page. Add a GridView and then add this code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;
using System.Threading;
using System.IdentityModel;
using System.IdentityModel.Claims;
using Microsoft.IdentityModel.Claims;

namespace WebApplication1
{
    public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page
    {
        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            IClaimsIdentity claimsIdentity = ((IClaimsPrincipal)(Thread.CurrentPrincipal)).Identities[0];

            GridView1.DataSource = claimsIdentity.Claims;
            GridView1.DataBind();
        }
    }
}

Rerun the test and you should get back some values.  I hope some light bulbs just turned on for some people :)

Data as a Service and the Applications that consume it

by Steve Syfuhs / July 30, 2010 04:00 PM

Over the past few months I have seen quite a few really cool technologies released or announced, and I believe they have a very real potential in many markets.  A lot of companies that exist outside the realm of Software Development, rarely have the opportunity to use such technologies.

Take for instance the company I work for: Woodbine Entertainment Group.  We have a few different businesses, but as a whole our market is Horse Racing.  Our business is not software development.  We don’t always get the chance to play with or use some of the new technologies released to the market.  I thought this would be a perfect opportunity to see what it will take to develop a new product using only new technologies.

Our core customer pretty much wants Race information.  We have proof of this by the mere fact that on our two websites, HorsePlayer Interactive and our main site, we have dedicated applications for viewing Races.  So lets build a third race browser.  Since we already have a way of viewing races from your computer, lets build it on the new Windows Phone 7.

The Phone – The application

This seems fairly straightforward.  We will essentially be building a Silverlight application.  Let’s take a look at what we need to do (in no particular order):

  1. Design the interface – Microsoft has loads of guidance on following with the Metro design.  In future posts I will talk about possible designs.
  2. Build the interface – XAML and C#.  Gotta love it.
  3. Build the Business Logic that drives the views – I would prefer to stay away from this, suffice to say I’m not entirely sure how proprietary this information is
  4. Build the Data Layer – Ah, the fun part.  How do you get the data from our internal servers onto the phone?  Easy, OData!

The Data

We have a massive database of all the Races on all the tracks that you can wager on through our systems.  The data updates every few seconds relative to changes from the tracks for things like cancellations or runner odds.  How do we push this data to the outside world for the phone to consume?  We create a WCF Data Service:

  1. Create an Entities Model of the Database
  2. Create Data Service
  3. Add Entity reference to Data Service (See code below)
 
    public class RaceBrowserData : DataService
{ public static void InitializeService(DataServiceConfiguration config) { if (config
== null) throw new ArgumentNullException("config"); config.UseVerboseErrors
= true; config.SetEntitySetAccessRule("*", EntitySetRights.AllRead); //config.SetEntitySetPageSize("*",
25); config.DataServiceBehavior.MaxProtocolVersion = DataServiceProtocolVersion.V2;
} } 

That’s actually all there is to it for the data.

The Authentication

The what?  Chances are the business will want to limit application access to only those who have accounts with us.  Especially so if we did something like add in the ability to place a wager on that race.  There are lots of ways to lock this down, but the simplest approach in this instance is to use a Secure Token Service.  I say this because we already have a user store and STS, and duplication of effort is wasted effort.  We create a STS Relying Party (The application that connects to the STS):

  1. Go to STS and get Federation Metadata.  It’s an XML document that tells relying parties what you can do with it.  In this case, we want to authenticate and get available Roles.  This is referred to as a Claim.  The role returned is a claim as defined by the STS.  Somewhat inaccurately, we would do this:
    1. App: Hello! I want these Claims for this user: “User Roles”.  I am now going to redirect to you.
    2. STS: I see you want these claims, very well.  Give me your username and password.
    3. STS: Okay, the user passed.  Here are the claims requested.  I am going to POST them back to you.
    4. App: Okay, back to our own processes.
  2. Once we have the Metadata, we add the STS as a reference to the Application, and call a web service to pass the credentials.
  3. If the credentials are accepted, we get returned the claims we want, which in this case would be available roles.
  4. If the user has the role to view races, we go into the Race view.  (All users would have this role, but adding Roles is a good thing if we needed to distinguish between wagering and non-wagering accounts)

One thing I didn’t mention is how we lock down the Data Service.  That’s a bit more tricky, and more suited for another post on the actual Data Layer itself.

So far we have laid the ground work for the development of a Race Browser application for the Windows Phone 7 using the Entity Framework and WCF Data Services, as well as discussed the use of the Windows Identity Foundation for authentication against an STS.

With any luck (and permission), more to follow.

C# Dynamic Type Conversions

by Steve Syfuhs / July 06, 2010 04:00 PM

I’ve been looking at ways of parsing types and values from text without having to do switch/case statements or explicit casting.  So far, based on my understanding of statically typed languages, is that this is impossible with a statically typed language.

<Question> Is this really true?</Question>

Given my current knowledge, my way of bypassing this is to use the new dynamic type in .NET 4.  It allows me to implicitly assign an object without having to cast it.  It works by bypassing the type checking at compile time.

Here’s a fairly straightforward example:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
	Type boolType = Type.GetType("System.Boolean");
	Console.WriteLine(!parse("true", boolType));

	Type dateTimeType = Type.GetType("System.DateTime");

	DateTime date = parse("7/7/2010", dateTimeType);
	Console.WriteLine(date.AddDays(1));

	Console.ReadLine();
}

static dynamic parse(string value, Type t)
{
	return Convert.ChangeType(value, t);
}

Now, if I were to do something crazy and call

DateTime someDate = parse(“1234”, Type.GetType(“System.Int32”));

a RuntimeBinderException would be thrown because you cannot implicitly convert between an int and a DateTime.

It certainly makes things a little easier.

AntiXss vs HttpUtility - So What?

by Steve Syfuhs / May 25, 2010 04:00 PM

Earlier today, Cory Fowler suggested I write up a post discussing the differences between the AntiXss library and the methods found in HttpUtility and how it helps defend from cross site scripting (xss).  As I was thinking about what to write, it occurred to me that I really had no idea how it did what it did, and why it differed from HttpUtility.  <side-track>I’m kinda wondering how many other people out there run in to the same thing?  We are told to use some technology because it does xyz better than abc, but when it comes right down to it, we aren’t quite sure of the internals.  Just a thought for later I suppose. </side-track>

A Quick Refresher

To quickly summarize what xss is: If you have a textbox on your website that someone can enter text into, and then on another page, display that same text, the user could maliciously add in <script> tags to do anything it wanted with JavaScript.  This usually results in redirecting to another website that shows advertisements or try’s to install malware.

The way to stop this is to not trust any input, and encode any character that could be part of a tag to an HtmlEncode’d entity.

HttpUtility does this though, right?

The HttpUtility class definitely does do this.  However, it is relatively limited in how it encodes possibly malicious text.  It works by encoding specific characters like the the brackets < > to &lt; and &gt;  This can get tricky because it you could theoretically bypass these characters (somehow – speculative).

Enter AntiXss

The AntiXss library works in essentially the opposite manner.  It has a white-list of allowed characters, and encodes everything else.  These characters are the usual a-z 0-9, etc characters.

Further Reading

I’m not really doing you, dear reader, any help by reiterating what dozens of people have said before me (and probably did it better), so here are a couple links that contain loads of information on actually using the AntiXss library and protecting your website from cross site scripting:

A Launch Event For Visual Studio

by Steve Syfuhs / April 11, 2010 04:00 PM

About 10 minutes ago I was told to sit down and open my laptop.  The event is about start, and the place is extremely crowded.  Barnaby Jeans is on stage doing the usual intro.  Twitter, blog, twit tweet tweet tweet #vs2010.

Sean Graglia hits the stage.  Today VS2010 and .NET 4.0 were released.  It makes you a little nostalgic about the old days of development.  The way things were done, the way teams worked, the way we tested.  It’s changed quite a bit since a quarter century ago.  We used to be proud of a user interface that worked on an 80x24 printout.  Notsomuch anymore.

We now need a new way of doing things.  Visual Studio 2010 can help us with this.  Whether we want to deliver to conventional devices, or things like the phone, or even the cloud, Visual Studio can help us from inception to release.

So here we have Keith Yedlin from Corp up to now discuss the value of 2010.  First up is multi-CPU.  .NET 4.0 has created the ability to easily multi-thread processes for faster processing.  That’s actually pretty cool.  Multi-threading applications is for lack of a better word, terrible.  It’s hard to do natively, its hard to do in Managed code, and it’s even harder to figure out what’s going on after the fact.

Now, that brings up an interesting thought.  Debugging can be tricky.  Visual Studio 2010 has introduced something pretty awesome.  You can now create trace files for the debugger, and while that’s not all that interesting, you can load that back into the debugger from a remote PC and run through exactly what happened.  That is pretty fricken awesome.

Team Foundation Server

TFS was first released in 2005.  It was tricky to use, and the learning curve was fairly high.  Oh, and it was bloody expensive.  2010 has changed that entirely.  It’s now easier to use, easier to manage, and cost is much more reasonable (read: free version - FTW).  This can (and does) easily translate into faster time to market, more bug/test coverage, and overall better code.  Win-win-win.

More to come.

Visual Studio 2010 RTM!

by Steve Syfuhs / April 11, 2010 04:00 PM

Earlier this morning, Microsoft launched Visual Studio 2010.  Woohoo!  here’s the jist:

Watch the Keynote and Channel 9 Live here: http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/en-us/watch-it-live

Get the real bits here (if you have an MSDN license): http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-ca/subscriptions/default.aspx

Get the trial bits here:

Get the Express versions here: http://www.microsoft.com/express/

All the important stuff you want/need to know about Visual Studio 2010 development: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-ca/ff625297.aspx

Enjoy!

ViewStateUserKey, ValidateAntiForgeryToken, and the Security Development Lifecycle

by Steve Syfuhs / April 08, 2010 04:00 PM

Last week Microsoft published the 5th revision to the SDL.  You can get it here: http://www.microsoft.com/security/sdl/default.aspx.

Of note, there are additions for .NET -- specifically ASP.NET and the MVC Framework.  Two key things I noticed initially were the addition of System.Web.UI.Page.ViewStateUserKey, and ValidateAntiForgeryToken Attribute in MVC.

Both have existed for a while, but they are now added to requirements for final testing.

ViewStateUserKey is page-specific identifier for a user.  Sort of a viewstate session.  It’s used to prevent forging of Form data from other pages, or in fancy terms it prevents Cross-site Request Forgery attacks.

Imagine a web form that has a couple fields on it – sensitive fields, say money transfer fields: account to, amount, transaction date, etc.  You need to log in, fill in the details, and click submit.  That submit POST’s the data back to the server, and the server processes it.  The only validation that goes on is whether the viewstate hasn’t been tampered with.

Okay, so now consider that you are still logged in to that site, and someone sends you a link to a funny picture of a cat.  Yay, kittehs!  Anyway, on that page is a simple set of hidden form tags with malicious data in it.  Something like their account number, and an obscene number for cash transfer.  On page load, javascript POST’s that form data to the transfer page, and since you are already logged in, the server accepts it.  Sneaky.

The reason this worked is because the viewstate was never modified.  It could be the same viewstate across multiple sessions.  Therefore, the way you fix this to add a session identifier to the viewstate through the ViewStateUserKey.  Be forewarned, you need to do this in Page_Init, otherwise it’ll throw an exception.  The easiest way to accomplish this is:

void Page_Init (object sender, EventArgs e) 
{ 
	ViewStateUserKey = Session.SessionID; 
}

Oddly simple.  I wonder why this isn’t default in the newer versions of ASP.NET?

Next up is the ValidateAntiForgeryToken attribute.

In MVC, you add this attribute to all POST action methods.  This attribute requires all POST’ed forms have a token associated with each request.  Each token is session specific, so if it’s an old or other-session token, the POST will fail.  So given that, you need to add the token to the page.  To do that you use the Html.AntiForgeryToken() helper to add the token to the form.

It prevents the same type of attack as the ViewStateUserKey, albeit in a much simpler fashion.

A Stab at a New Resume

by Steve Syfuhs / February 19, 2010 04:00 PM

While I am definitely not looking for a new job, I was bored and thought I would take a stab at a stylized resume to see if I could hone some of my (lack of) graphics skills.  It didn’t turn out too badly, but I am certainly no graphics designer.

What do you think?

mainResume

// About

Steve is a renaissance kid when it comes to technology. He spends his time in the security stack.